Dennis, Here Are Your Articles for Wednesday, September 30, 2020
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Is This Your Situation: Concerned About Strategic Tax Planning and Itemizing

 

The Tax Cuts and Jobs Act of 2017 (TCJA) made major changes that affect how individual taxpayers can claim deductions. For individual taxpayers, the biggest changes were (1) the increase in the standard deduction, which significantly raised the threshold for claiming itemized deductions; (2) the suspension of some itemized deductions (e.g., moving expenses and miscellaneous itemized deductions) and a higher cap on others (3) the cap for state and local taxes; (4) the suspension of the deduction for personal exemptions;and (5) the much higher estate tax exemption.

The result is that only about 10 percent of American households can itemize their deductions. This may change in 2025 when some of the changes made by the TCJA are scheduled to sunset, if they aren’t made permanent before then.

Despite these changes, good tax planning may make it possible to itemize deductions in alternate years or if there is an exceptional life event.

The following four deductions may make it possible for taxpayers to exceed the standard deduction and itemize:

Medical Expenses

Medical expenses are deductible to the extent they exceed 7.5 percent of adjusted gross income (AGI). For most people, health insurance covers most of the expense and their out-of-pocket expenses won’t meet the threshold. Some exceptions, however, may make it possible to exceed it:

  • Long-term care is expensive, and it usually isn’t covered by insurance.
  • Dental and orthodontic costs are allowed. Many people either don’t have dental insurance or the insurance doesn’t cover the entire expense.
  • Major health events with noncovered expenses. Noncovered drugs and other unforeseen expenses can be deducted.

Depending on your particular situation, expenses like these may put you over the threshold, either annually or in intermittent years. Keep in mind that even with this, you must still exceed the standard deduction to be able to itemize.

State and Local Taxes (SALT)

The cap on the SALT deduction, which includes property, income and sales taxes, applies to both individual and joint filers. Consequently, all taxpayers who reach that cap are that much closer to the standard deduction These taxpayers should pay close attention to their other deductions. When they are all “bundled” together, the threshold may be met.

Charitable Giving

Depending on income and level of giving, it may be possible to take this deduction annually. Donors who don’t give enough to meet the standard deduction threshold still have options: they can make their donations every second or third year (depending on their budget), or they can contribute to a donor-advised fund, which allow donors to take a deduction in the year of the gift and designate charities as recipients later. These funds generally have fees.

Other Deductions

It may be possible to itemize other deductions as well, including miscellaneous deductions not subject to the 2 percent AGI floor (e.g., gambling losses to the extent of gambling winnings), interest paid for investment purposes and Ponzi scheme losses.

Most taxpayers don’t have enough in itemized deductions to claim them annually. With good tax planning, however, it may be possible to claim them in intermittent years. Contact us today for other tax-planning strategies.

 
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Our firm provides the information in this e-newsletter for general guidance only, and does not constitute the provision of legal advice, tax advice, accounting services, investment advice, or professional consulting of any kind. The information provided herein should not be used as a substitute for consultation with professional tax, accounting, legal, or other competent advisers. Before making any decision or taking any action, you should consult a professional adviser who has been provided with all pertinent facts relevant to your particular situation. Tax articles in this e-newsletter are not intended to be used, and cannot be used by any taxpayer, for the purpose of avoiding accuracy-related penalties that may be imposed on the taxpayer. The information is provided "as is," with no assurance or guarantee of completeness, accuracy, or timeliness of the information, and without warranty of any kind, express or implied, including but not limited to warranties of performance, merchantability, and fitness for a particular purpose.
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