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Estate Tax Exemption Amount Goes Up for 2022

 

As the estate tax exemption amount increases, fewer estates are subject to the federal tax.

The federal estate tax exemption is going up again for 2022. The amount is adjusted each year for inflation, so that's not a surprise. But it's still a big deal when the new exemption is announced each year because there's a lot at stake for certain high-income Americans.

2022 Estate Tax Exemption

Generally, when you die, your estate is not subject to the federal estate tax if the value of your estate is less than the exemption amount. For people who pass away in 2022, the exemption amount will be $12.06 million (it's $11.7 million for 2021). For a married couple, that comes to a combined exemption of $24.12 million.

Estate Tax Rate

As you might guess, only a small percentage of Americans die with an estate worth $11.7 million or more. But for estates that do, the federal tax bill is pretty steep. Most of the estate's value is taxed at a 40% rate.As the table below shows, the first $1 million is taxed at lower rates – from 18% to 39%. That results in a total tax of $345,800 on the first $1 million, which is $54,200 less than what the tax would be if the entire estate were taxed at the top rate. However, once you get past the first $1 million, everything else is taxed at the 40% rate.

 Rate 

 Taxable Amount (Value of Estate Exceeding Exemption) 

18%

$0 to $10,000

20%

$10,001 to $20,000

22%

$20,001 to $40,000

24%

$40,001 to $60,000

26%

$60,001 to $80,000

28%

$80,001 to $100,000

30%

$100,001 to $150,000

32%

$150,001 to $250,000

34%

$250,001 to $500,000

37%

$500,001 to $750,000

39%

$750,001 to $1 million

40%

Over $1 million

Historical Estate Tax Exemption Amounts

Since the federal estate tax was reformed in 1976, the estate tax exemption has only gone up (see table below). In most cases, the increase is modest, such as a simple adjustment for inflation. However, at times, the exemption amount has jumped considerably. For example, it shot up from $675,000 to $1 million in 2002, from $1 million to $5 million in 2011, and from $5.49 million to $11.18 million in 2018.

But that pattern is scheduled to change. The 2018 estate tax examption increase is only temporary, so the base exemption amount is set to drop back down to $5 million (adjusted for inflation) in 2026.

Period

Exemption Amount

1977 (Quarters 1 and 2)

$30,000

1977 (Quarters 3 and 4)

$120,667

1978

$134,000

1979

$147,333

1980

$161,563

1981

$175,625

1982

$225,000

1983

$275,000

1984

$325,000

1985

$400,000

1986

$500,000

1987 through 1997

$600,000

1998

$625,000

1999

$650,000

2000 and 2001

$675,000

2002 through 2010

$1,000,000

2011

$5,000,000

2012

$5,120,000

2013

$5,250,000

2014

$5,340,000

2015

$5,430,000

2016

$5,450,000

2017

$5,490,000

2018

$11,180,000

2019

$11,400,000

2020

$11,580,000

2021

$11,700,000

2022

$12,060,000

State Estate Taxes

Just because your estate isn't hit with the federal estate tax, that doesn't necessarily mean you're completely off the hook. Your estate might be subject to a state estate tax. Twelve states and the District of Columbia impose their own estate tax, and the state exemption amounts are often much lower than the federal estate tax exemption. For instance, the exemption amount in Massachusetts and Oregon is only $1 million.

Plus, six states levy an inheritance tax, which is paid directly by your heirs. (Maryland has both an estate tax and an inheritance tax!) So, just because your estate isn't worth millions of dollars, you children and grandchildren might end up with less in their pockets when you die than what you're expecting.

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Our firm provides the information in this e-newsletter for general guidance only, and does not constitute the provision of legal advice, tax advice, accounting services, investment advice, or professional consulting of any kind. The information provided herein should not be used as a substitute for consultation with professional tax, accounting, legal, or other competent advisers. Before making any decision or taking any action, you should consult a professional adviser who has been provided with all pertinent facts relevant to your particular situation. Tax articles in this e-newsletter are not intended to be used, and cannot be used by any taxpayer, for the purpose of avoiding accuracy-related penalties that may be imposed on the taxpayer. The information is provided "as is," with no assurance or guarantee of completeness, accuracy, or timeliness of the information, and without warranty of any kind, express or implied, including but not limited to warranties of performance, merchantability, and fitness for a particular purpose.
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