Hello Maria Here are your articles for Friday, March 07, 2014
Is this email not displaying correctly?
View it in your browser .
Maria DePasquale 
Maria DePasquale 
Realtor, CRS, e-PRO,SRES
(412) 953-8174
maria.depasquale@verizon.net
5887 Forbes Ave
Pittsburgh, PA 15217-1601
My Website
My Listings
For Buyers
MLS Search
For Sellers
Share Save

Does Your Auto Insurance Cover Pothole Damage?

 

When it comes to potholes and car insurance, there’s good news and bad news.

The good news is, yes, pothole damage is usually covered—providing you have collision coverage. 

The bad news: You only get coverage if your claim is higher than your deductible and every claim you file goes on your permanent record.

Pothole damage comes under collision coverage. That’s an optional in the standard auto insurance policy and covers damage to your car that happens when you collide with an object like a pothole (or another car or even a house). It also covers you if you flip your car over.

It doesn't cover wear and tear to a car or its tires due to bad road conditions.

Check the declarations page of your policy to see what your collision deductible is. That’s the amount the insurance company is going to subtract before paying your claim.

If a pothole causes damage that’s more costly than your deductible, you can file a claim for your repair costs minus your deductible. Your collision coverage will reimburse you for the costs of repairing your car, minus the deductible.

But consider carefully before you file for just a small amount over your deductible. It could end up costing you more in future premiums. Every claim you make goes into your insurance permanent record, called your CLUE report. Insurance companies use your CLUE report to decide how much to charge you for auto (and homeowners) insurance. 

Wondering what’s already in your CLUE reports? You can order free copies online from Lexis/ Nexis®. 

Pothole Accidents

When hitting a pothole causes you to hit another car, or a pedestrian, then your liability insurance kicks in. You must have that unless you live in New Hampshire, where it’s not required. Liability covers damage and injuries you, or your designated driver, cause.

Photo source: MSVG via flickr 

 
Share Save

Your Comments

Saved Articles
Comments and Feedback
Refer A Friend
Your Privacy
Our firm provides the information in this e-newsletter for general guidance only, and does not constitute the provision of legal advice, tax advice, accounting services, investment advice, or professional consulting of any kind. The information provided herein should not be used as a substitute for consultation with professional tax, accounting, legal, or other competent advisers. Before making any decision or taking any action, you should consult a professional adviser who has been provided with all pertinent facts relevant to your particular situation. Tax articles in this e-newsletter are not intended to be used, and cannot be used by any taxpayer, for the purpose of avoiding accuracy-related penalties that may be imposed on the taxpayer. The information is provided "as is," with no assurance or guarantee of completeness, accuracy, or timeliness of the information, and without warranty of any kind, express or implied, including but not limited to warranties of performance, merchantability, and fitness for a particular purpose.
Powered by
Copyright © HomeActions, LLC All rights reserved.

This email was sent to: maria.depasquale@verizon.net

Mailing address: 5887 Forbes Ave, Pittsburgh, PA 15217-1601